October 12, 2017

11
Oct

October 12, 2017

GROUP WARM-UP
25 Calories row
10 Push press
10 Russian kettlebell swings
10 Box jump over

PARTNER WORKOUT
5 rounds of
15 Calories row
10 Push press 45/35

go directly into

5 rounds of
10 Russian kettlebell swings 55/35
10 Box jump over 24/20
*Each partner completes a round before switching back and forth.

STRENGTH
12 EMOM
5 Barbell bicep curls
5 Dumbbell side delt raises

MIDLINE
3 sets of:
+trainer-led
10 Abmat sit ups
:20 Hollow hold
:20 Plank
10 Abmat sit ups
Rest 1 Minute between sets

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO KITTY & RICK BAKER! 

Congratulations Johnny!
Coach Johnny Zambito successfully passed his boards and is now a certified Physical Therapy Assistant. We had no doubt in him and are proud of what his knowledge brings to our coaching staff.

Dieting Hopping
The following is my synopsis of a health report I read in a recent issue of Shape. 

Low carb/Keto, Paleo, Whole30…there are lots of approaches to diet, all aimed at higher level of health and wellness. Each boasts scientific studies and buy-in from millions of people. But, are diets that tend to be restrictive doing more harm than good in the long run?

Many experts agree that your body needs consistency and a well-designed eating plan to stay healthy and not negatively affect your gut and metabolism. In the case of diets that eliminate entire good groups, you could be missing out on important nutrients. For instance, the keto diet is very low carb and high fat. By eliminating carbs and not eating grains, fruits and vegetables, you can be deficient in fiber intake, antioxidants and many vitamins.

Many restrictive diets don’t call for measurement – eat as much as you want of the “allowed” foods and you’re good to go. The problem here is that you may eat way too many calories one week and not enough the next. Your body likes consistency, so this approach can mess up hunger cues and your metabolism.

Bottom line: what I gathered from this article is that balance is the key. Eat a variety of foods. Be aware of the amounts you are eating and make sure they are consistent with your energy expenditure. That’s why tracking helps – you can eat appropriate amounts, nothing is off limits, no food shaming, etc.

Believe me, I’ve tried it all: Paleo, keto, intermittent fasting, high carb, Atkins, etc. What I’ve seen work best for me and for our members is a focus on food quality, eating for performance, consuming appropriate quantities for your goal and allowing for enjoyment. If you feel too restricted, you won’t be happy and you won’t stick to it for the long haul, anyway.